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Rewilding

Rewilding and Science

Rewilding and Science

Journalist Daniel Cossins writes about Rewilding and Science in the latest issue of The Scientist. He talks with Josh Donlan on his view of rewilding and the need for more science to document the benefits, costs, and risks of rewilding.

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De-extinction in a crisis discipline

De-extinction in a crisis discipline

De-extinction, the idea of resurrecting extinct species using genetic engineering, has recently caught the attention of both the scientific community and the wider public. A diverse group of scientists and practitioners, led by long-time environmental proponent Stewart Brand, has been busy articulating a framework for de-extinction and exploring a roadmap forward, including identifying the many challenges that lie ahead. De- extinction may mean different things to different people. The Long Now Foundation defines it as using “genetic technology and DNA from museum specimens or fossils to revive species that have gone totally extinct.” Related discussions are also underway around using genetic engineering to assist populations in adapting to climate change and other extinction drivers. De-extinction has sparked a lively debate on biodiversity conservation strategies, one with plenty of detractors who give reasons why it is a bad idea or that it will never deliver on its promise. 

The Mammoth Commeth

ACS's Josh Donlan is quoted in the New York Times Magazine article The Mammoth Commeth by Nathaniel Rich. Rich explores the latest developments and challenges around de-extinction. Bringing extinct animals back to life is really happening — and it’s going to be very, very cool. Unless it ends up being very, very bad.